BUILDING RESOURCES TO END RACISM

The Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) is a multiyear project intended to increase the amount and effectiveness of resources aimed at combating institutional and structural racism in communities through capacity building, education, and convening of grantmakers and grantseekers.


PRE Events & Announcements:

PRE's Advisory Board and Staff are excited to announce the publication of Critical Issues Forum, Volume 5: Moving Forward on Racial Justice Philanthropy

"Have you seen any progress?" If you work in any social change arena long enough you are bound to be asked this question many times. We ask it of ourselves, and it is asked by our funders or boards or others.

As the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity celebrated our 10th anniversary last year and engaged allies within the nonprofit and philanthropic sectors to mark the occasion with us, we heard this question repeatedly and knew it was important to take stock of what many of us have been collectively aiming to move for decades.

As with most social justice work, the reality of moving a racial justice approach within philanthropy has been a mix of progress and setbacks. It is important to examine where has there been more or less progress, what has contributed to it and what may have diverted us. And even more critically, we must clarify where we need to go next, ideally building on lessons of the past.

Grantmaking with a structural racialization lens is complex and evolving. Within this volume, we address the concept, the dynamics of structural interventions, the challenges of measurement and the lessons that some funders and activists have gleaned.

The past year, through focus groups, webinars and direct interviews, our team has sought to get a strong sense of both funders' and activists' perspectives on progress particularly over the past two decades. We have heard real frustration, especially as the needs are so critical and the level of urgency among activists and communities is so high. However, in spite of these very real concerns, we have also seen clear commitment and depth of understanding in other quarters. We are pleased that through funder case studies and activist essays about structural racism analysis, intersectionality and media justice, we're able to share real progress, even as each piece recognizes there is still much more to be done.

As with each volume of PRE's Critical Issues Forum, we offer these articles with the hope of sparking deeper discourse and greater learning in the field. Even more so than in the past, we hope that publishing the volume online creates a shared space for others to weigh in. We invite you to join in the dialogue as we reflect and continue building on the work of so many before us, and create new bridges for the many who are taking up this work now and after us.

Please contact us at pre-asst@racialequity.org if you would like to order a hard copy, or download individual articles for free here. We encourage you to share all or the most relevant parts with your colleagues and other networks.

Previous PRE Events & Announcements:

January 15, 2015 Boston, Massachusetts (closed meeting)
Social Justice Funders Network (SJFN) Retreat

Lori Villarosa will present at SJFN retreat, focusing on:

-Racial justice funding nationally, including challenges and opportunities for funders to deepen their partnerships and impacts with communities of color toward more just outcomes for all;

-Grantmaking that addresses structural racism/racialization: What key components must be in place? (including clear racial analysis, power-building, multi-institutional/multi-sector, etc); and

-Potential foundation/community barriers that may exist toward effectively supporting these, using various examples from other cities or states, including Seattle, Detroit, CA, OR, NC & some funding networks/initiatives.

SJFN is a shared learning, shared practice safe space for individuals who work in philanthropy to support each other regardless of family, community, individual donors who identify as "social justice" funders.


November 13-15, 2014 Dallas, Texas
Facing Race 2014 a National Conference

Friday, November 14, 2014, 11:00am - 12:30pm
Moving Foundations Toward Racial Justice Grantmaking

Join us to discuss case studies conducted by PRE on The California Endowment, Woods Fund of Chicago and Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation - each of which has been on a trajectory to move toward greater grantmaking aimed at combatting structural racism to achieve racial justice. The foundations operate at different levels (local, statewide and national) and are at different stages of their evolution. This session will share stories from various vantage points of trustees, staff and grantees - and importantly, will lift up lessons and opportunities where activists were able to engage and influence the institutional change processes to move funding toward racial justice.

Speakers:
Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity; David L. Neal, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; Caronina Grimble, Woods Fund of Chicago; Sandra Witt, The California Endowment

October 29-30, 2014 Minneapolis, Minnesota (closed meeting)

2014 Convergence Leadership Institute

Get on Board: Engaging Philanthropic Leadership & Trustees to Support Equity & Advocacy
Establishing a funding portfolio to support equity-focused policy advocacy and build advocacy skills of community residents may be unfamiliar territory for trustees and senior foundation leadership. These investment strategies yield outcomes over a longer timeframe and may not seem as tangible to leaders more familiar with funding service delivery programs. This session will give participants an opportunity to consider how to approach trustees and senior leadership to build stronger organizational commitments to investing in advocacy and equity.

Coaches:
Jennifer Martin, The Seattle Foundation; Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity; Leslie Mikkelsen, Prevention Institute

All-Group Coaching Session & Panel Discussion: Grantmaking with a Racial Equity Lens
Deepening racial and economic inequities coupled with our nation's rapidly changing demographics require greater intentionality to the types and approaches by which philanthropy does its grantmaking. Racial equity can provide a powerful "lens" by problems are understood and strategies are shaped, from what is funded and who is funded to when and how grants are made.

Coaches:
Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity; Chris Kabel, Kresge Foundation; Jasmine Hall-Ratliff, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation



August 5-6, 2014 Minneapolis, Minnesota

Convening on Racial Equity

Funders Learning/Strategy Meeting
In advance of the Convening on Racial Equity the funder meeting is open to grantmakers who recognize the leveraging role that government can play in achieving racial equity in cities and regions and are interested in connecting with other place-based funders and learning more about the Government Alliance on Race and Equity.

There will be discussion of the immediate practical ways funders can engage with the Alliance, including innovative funding strategies targeted at eliminating structural racism and opportunities to work in partnerships with government and the community at the regional level. It will also be explored whether there would be value in a debriefing space and additional exchange for funders after the full conference, either in person or via conference call.

A variety of resource people plan to participate in the meeting, including elected officials, peer funders and the following national experts: john a. powell, director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, U-C Berkeley; Glenn Harris, new president of the Center for Social Inclusion (and former Race and Social Justice Initiative Manager; and Julie Nelson, director of the Government Alliance on Race and Equity, and former Director of the City of Seattle Office of Civil Rights.

Hosted by:
PRE, Neighborhood Funders Group and Government Alliance on Race and Equity.


June 6 - 8, 2014, Washington, DC

Joint Affinity Group Unity Summit

A conference for JAG partners, their members and stakeholders to create shared strategies for advancing equity, assess equity work, and develop a new vision & plan for collaboration.

Saturday, June 7, 2014 Washington, DC: 7:30- 9:00AM
Location: Grand Ballroom South/Central

Breakfast at the Main Stage: Telling Our Story: A 20-Year Retrospective on the Movement for Equity in Philanthropy
For decades, bold philanthropic leaders have worked through networks such as the JAG affinity groups to advance equity and social change in and through philanthropy. From the birth of ABFE in a moment of protest in 1971, to the response to the HIV crisis in 1980s and the founding of JAG in 1994, a panel of leaders will share stories and lessons learned from the rich history of the movement to democratize philanthropy. What have been some of the most successful strategies for advancing equity in philanthropy? What have been the greatest challenges and what have we learned? As we move forward, how can we work collectively to advance social change through philanthropy?

A conversation with Peggy Saika, President and Executive Director, AAPIP; Lori Villarosa, Executive Director and Founder, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE); Alandra Washington, Ph.D., Director of Organizational Quality and Effectiveness, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; and Cindy Rizzo, Vice President, Impact & Learning, Arcus Foundation

9:30- 10:30AM

Academy 1: Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

Our Change, Our Voices
"History teaches us that change is often made when an organized segment of those most affected, leading in solidarity with allies, disrupt business as usual." Building on this quote from Makani Themba, this session will present a mix of national and local examples of communications and culture shift strategies to work effectively across identity lines, build movement and advance racial justice from the perspectives of leaders in the field at different levels, as activists and as funders. And critically, it will share concrete tools for funders seeking to increase their impact and affect policies that will truly improve the lives of all.

Presenters: Rinku Sen, Race Forward and Makani Themba, The Praxis Project ; Moderator: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

May 20 - 22, 2014, Nashville, TN

Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees

2014 National Convening: Immigrants, Philanthropy, and America's Future: Learning from the U.S. South

From rural towns to sprawling metropolises, the face of America is changing. Recent demographic shifts have been especially pronounced in the U.S. South, where foreign-born migration is at a historic high. As with the country as a whole, immigrants in the South have invigorated declining communities, spurred economic growth, and reversed negative population trends. But with change also come challenges, some anticipated and some unforeseen. GCIR's 2014 National Convening will consider how philanthropy can address these challenges and the opportunities they present. It will highlight the latest issues and trends in the field, effective funding strategies, and innovative program and policy models from this dynamic region, as well as other sites across the country.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014, 3:30-5:00PM

Navigating Race & Immigration: A Roadmap for Funders

This interactive session will explore strategies for navigating sometimes challenging, but critically important conversations on immigration, race, and the nation's shifting cultural identity. As funders, what are strategies and tools we can use to effectively navigate these issues to advance immigrant integration and positively impact all members of our communities?

Presenter: Rinku Sen, Race Forward; Facilitator: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

Wednesday, April 30, 2014 Berkley, CA 11:30- 1:00PM

From Transaction to Transformation: Why a Structural Racialization Analysis is Essential for Challenging Global Corporate Power

While most progressives recognize linkages between race, income equality and corporate power, too often strategies fail to explicitly incorporate a structural racialization analysis or adequately develop campaigns that frame issues in ways that effectively engage communities of color, buffer against wedges or achieve wins that actually impact those most affected by much of the misalignment of resources and our stated values. This session will provide a mix of compelling and clear analysis of structural racialization and the historic and contemporary ties between race/corporations, along with example of organizing efforts utilizing this frame in the US and in connection with global partners to achieve deeper transformation and not simply limited transactional changes.

Presenters: john powell, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society Taj James, Movement Strategy Center; Saru Jayaraman, ROC-United and Food Labor Research Center. Moderator: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

April 7 - 8, 2014, Detroit, MI

Detroit Bankruptcy and Beyond: Organizing for Change in Distressed Cities

The Damon Keith Center for Civil Rights at Wayne State University Law School, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society at UC Berkeley, and Metropolitan Organizing Strategy Enabling Strength (MOSES) invite you to Detroit Bankruptcy and Beyond: Organizing for Change in Distressed Cities.

Registration info

Including a funder strategy session hosted by PRE on April 7. Please contact us for additional information.

Thursday, November 21, 2013 Jackson, Mississippi

Implicit Racial Bias: A Practical Guide to Unlocking Racial Anxiety & Advancing Justice

Neighborhood Funders Group Convening 2013

National attention on racial justice setbacks on Voting Rights, on the verdict in the Trayvon Martin case, and more have brought increasing discourse on the issues of implicit racial bias and its impacts on people's actions and decisions. Much of the discussion has been in relationship to research, communications and increasingly now moving to legal implications and policy, but what does this mean for community organizing? How do organizers develop campaigns that both factor in implications of implicit bias and ideally chisel away at the structures that perpetuate the negative, criminalizing, and dehumanizing views about people of color, and in particular African-American and Latino young men and boys? What are some concrete examples of community organizing lessons that can tackle structural racism at both explicit and implicit level? Starting with the South, but clearly moving beyond, join us for a highly interactive and iterative session among researcher/advocates and organizers at the early stages of exploring how to work more effectively in this non-post-racial time.

Speakers: Rachel Godsil, American Values Institute;Derrick Johnson, One Voice Mississippi;Gihan Perera,Florida New Majority; Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (moderator).

Thursday, November 21, 2013 Jackson, Mississippi

Implicit Racial Bias: A Practical Guide to Unlocking Racial Anxiety & Advancing Justice

Neighborhood Funders Group Convening 2013

National attention on racial justice setbacks on Voting Rights, on the verdict in the Trayvon Martin case, and more have brought increasing discourse on the issues of implicit racial bias and its impacts on people's actions and decisions. Much of the discussion has been in relationship to research, communications and increasingly now moving to legal implications and policy, but what does this mean for community organizing? How do organizers develop campaigns that both factor in implications of implicit bias and ideally chisel away at the structures that perpetuate the negative, criminalizing, and dehumanizing views about people of color, and in particular African-American and Latino young men and boys? What are some concrete examples of community organizing lessons that can tackle structural racism at both explicit and implicit level? Starting with the South, but clearly moving beyond, join us for a highly interactive and iterative session among researcher/advocates and organizers at the early stages of exploring how to work more effectively in this non-post-racial time.

Speakers: Rachel Godsil, American Values Institute;Derrick Johnson, One Voice Mississippi;Gihan Perera,Florida New Majority; Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (moderator).

November 18-20, 2013 Jackson, Mississippi

Mississippi Delta Learning Tour

Neighborhood Funders Group Convening 2013

The Mississippi Delta Learning Tour is open to all funders, regardless of participation in the NFG convening. We encourage attendance by funders who fund worker rights, workforce development, and economic justice/economic development at local, regional or national levels; fund in the South; or are interested in learning more about how the legacy of the Southern civil rights movement influences present-day efforts for social, economic and racial justice on a national level. .

October 3, 2013 Grand Rapids, Michigan (closed meeting)

Racial Equity in Organizations

Speakers:

Moderator: Jennifer White, NPR State of Opportunity; Vicki Rosenberg,Vicki Rosenberg & Associates and Lori Villarosa, PRE.

May 6, 2013 Chicago, Illinois 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

LET'S TALK ABOUT RACE

Donors Forum Large Conference Room, 208 S. LaSalle, Suite 1535

The inability to talk about race effectively is a hallmark of the 21st century. And yet, inequity is designed into many of our systems. As we make grants in a multicultural, multi-lingual world with shifting demographics, how do we as grantmakers not only join the dialogue about race, but move it forward confidently? How do we discuss issues of race and racism with grantseekers, with peers, and with trustees in a way that deepens shared understanding and increases our impact? What are the questions we should ask ourselves in order to ensure our work helps to change the sector?

Speakers:

Colleagues from the Peer Network for New Grantmakers and exchange facilitated by Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity.

March 27, 2013 St. Paul, Minnesota

Coffee Conversations: All Things Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Bush Foundation, 332 Minnesota Street, Suite East-900, St Paul, Minnesota, 55101

How can we help create the conditions within our foundations for safe exploration and profound learning on issues around race? At this gathering, we will examine the use of courageous conversation as a strategy to move toward greater diversity within our organizations. Jennifer Ford Reedy, president, Bush Foundation, will open our meeting by sharing Bush Foundation's efforts around diversity. We will then hear from Lori Villarosa, executive director, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity, on how to introduce a discussion of race within an organization. Lissa Jones, director of diversity, equity and inclusion, Minnesota Council on Foundations, will facilitate a dialogue on how each of us can lead in courageous conversations.

Speakers:

Jennifer Ford Reedy, president, Bush Foundation ; Lori Villarosa, executive director, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE)

March 22, 2013 Chicago, Illinois 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

DEMOGRAPHY & PHILANTHROPY

Donors Forum Large Conference Room, 208 S. LaSalle, Suite 1535

The 2010 Census awoke much of the U.S. new the new multicultural reality. Then the 2012 Presidential election sealed it. Demographics are changing and a new majority is rising. The inability to recognize and thoughtfully examine this shift is a liability. So, what does this mean for grantmakers today? For nonprofits?

Speakers:

Lori Villarosa, Executive Director of the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equality and Kelly Brown, Director of D5, a five-year coalition to grow diversity within the philanthropic community, will provide an overview of the current landscape, trends on the horizon, and nuts and bolts to enhance your understanding of the field and practice.

December 13-14, 2012 Seattle, Washington

Governing For Racial Equity 2012

Measuring Our Progress: Racial Equity Evaluation Tools and Success Markers

If data are needed to make a case for injustice and to show progress, then how can we measure progress in achieving racial equity? Choosing the accurate and realistic indicators and markers of success are critical parts of data collection. How does evaluation contribute to or detract from the ongoing activities of community organizers? This session will engage evaluators and other community leaders in robust discussions and exchanges about a variety of racial equity assessment strategies and social justice success markers.

Speakers:

Lori Villarosa, PRE; Nina Narelle and Jen Lleras, Western States Center; Julie Nelson, Seattle Office for Civil Rights

Philanthropy and Government Partnerships

How can philanthropic foundations and government team up to advance racial equity? What are the opportunities for collaboration? What are the challenges? Join us for a discussion with national and local leaders in philanthropy who are exploring innovative ways to work in partnership with government as we build a movement for racial equity.

Speakers:

Lori Villarosa, PRE; Maggie Potapchuk, MP Associates; Michael Brown, Seattle Foundation; Zeke Spier, Social Justice Fund

PRE Board Member john.a.powell- Director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society will be featured among the plenary speakers.

November 8, 2012 Charleston, South Carolina

Southeastern Council of Foundations 2012 Annual Meeting

"Diversity in Grantmaking: Grantmaking with an Equity Lens"

This session will equip practitioners by providing in-depth discussions of resources to help philanthropic organizations address equity within their own foundations, with community members and/or the nonprofit sector. Examples of how to apply three selected tools for culturally effective and responsive philanthropy that specifically address racial equity will be presented: 1) Race Matters Tool Kit (Annie E. Casey Foundation & Voices of America's Children; 2) Responsive Philanthropy in Black Communities Tool Kit (ABFE); and 3) Grantmaking with a Racial Equity Lens (PRE & GrantCraft).

Speakers:
Susan Batten, President, Association for Black Foundation Representatives
Delia Carmen, Director, Race Matters Institute
Lori Villarosa, PRE


November 15-17 Baltimore, MD

Applied Research Center's Facing Race 2012

Organizing Racial Justice Philanthropy

Presenters:
Susan Batten, Association of Black Foundation Executives (ABFE); Lisa Ranghelli, National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP); Dennis Quirin, Race & Equity Collaborative, Proteus Fund Moderator and Presenter: Lori Villarosa, PRE


June 28, 2012 Washington, DC

Voices for America's Children and KIDS COUNT Joint Conference

"The All-Important Outcomes "

What is both meaningful and realistic when evaluating work to change complex, cumulative and deeply entrenched conditions that impact the lives of our nation's children? How do we assess progress toward long term change and true transformation when so many of our indicators are short term and transactional, and how do we convey these expectations to potential funders and others who support our work? In spite of the conceptual and practical challenges, we all want to know if our short-term gains are leading to longer term, sustainable and important changes. This interactive session will frame these challenges, offer examples of current evaluation efforts and share suggestions for articulating the outcomes we expect to achieve. It is intended for executive staff, board leaders, development staff and any interested conference participant.

Moderator: Ann Segal, Director for disadvantaged children and families,Wellspring Advisors. Presenters: Johanna Morariu , Director, Innovation Network; Carol Trawick , President, Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation; Lori Villarosa, PRE


March 27, 2012 East Lansing, MI

State of Opportunity: The Road Ahead for Michigan; Council of Michigan Foundations

Making the Case for Change for Michigan
To explore the state of opportunity and equity in Michigan, particularly as it relates to the P-20 Continuum (prenatal care through age 20) and ways that grantmakers and others are working to expand opportunity and equity.

Jocelyn Sargent, Program Officer, W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Panelists:
Amber Arellano, Executive Director, The Education Trust-Midwest
Karen Holcomb-Merrill, Policy Director, Michigan League of Human Services
James Vander Hulst, President/CEO, West Michigan TEAM
Marianne Udow-Phillips, Director, Center for Health Care Research & Transformation, University of Michigan and former director, Michigan Department of Human Services
Moderator: Lori Villarosa


March 24-26, 2012 Seattle, WA

Professionals Learning About Community, Equity & Smart Growth (PLACES) Program of the Funders Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities [By invitation only for PLACES Fellows]

March 24:An Attempt to Unwind Institutional Racialization: Race and Social Justice in Grantmaking and the Seattle Race and Social Justice Initiative
Seattle's Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI) is a citywide effort led by the Seattle Office of Civil Rights and an interdepartmental team of City staff to realize the vision of racial equity by eradicating its biggest barrier: institutional racism. Discussing grantmaking trends and tools to address race and social justice and provide tangible examples of how PLACES fellows can deepen a focus on racial justice within their grantmaking and community activities.

Presenters and workshop guides:
Glenn Harris, Director, RSJI
Lori Villarosa

March 25: How Grantmakers and Local Non-profits Work to Implement Racial Equity in Seattle: Panel of Grantmakers in Race and Smart Growth Areas
Understand how grantmakers and local non-profits define the area of equity and smart growth, how they define a strategy for a solution and how funding is shaped to address the issues - or might be in the future.

Panelists:
Zeke Spier, Executive Director, Social Justice Fund NW
Estella Ortega, Executive Director, El Centro de La Raza
Heidi Hall, Impact Capital, head of the Equity Caucus for the Sustainable Communities program in King County
Dustin Washington, AFSE, Tyree Scott Leadership School
Moderator: Lori Villarosa


March 19, 2012 San Antonio, TX
Grants Managers Network Annual Conference

Incorporating Diversity into Grantmaking
Integrating diversity is a hot topic in philanthropy. Countless initiatives and programs seek to ensure grantmakers are meeting the needs of all communities. How can you track and evaluate the diversity of your current and potential grantees, and what systems need to be in place to ensure that you meet your organization's goals around diversity? This session will build on the knowledge of grants managers and highlight the unique role that grants management plays in data collection, management, and analysis.

Speakers
Bryan Glover, Communications Officer, Funders for LGBTQ Issues
Lori Villarosa



March 16, 2012 Columbus, OH
Transforming Race 2012

Race and the Future of Social Justice Philanthropy
Looking ahead 30 years, we can imagine a future in which significant advances have been made to achieve racial justice. What might those advances be? What role has philanthropy played in getting us there? What kind of strategic partnerships might be formed with funders in alliance with racial justice efforts? Where should leadership originate? How might philanthropy engage with the broad field of organizations, leaders and networks to help build powerful campaigns that could win changes in structural racism? A panel of racial justice funders will explore these and other questions and invite conference participants to share their perspectives as well. This session intends to create the outline of a plan that might deepen the impact of philanthropy in achieving racial justice.

Session leaders:
Lori Villarosa; James Gore,Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; Archana Sahgal, Open Society Foundations; Alvin Starks, Kellogg Foundation; Meg Gage, Proteus Fund, facilitator

January 20th, 2012 Seattle, WA
Governing for Racial Equity

The daylong event will be an opportunity to deepen skills in promoting inclusion, diversity and racial justice and to build institution's ability to address racial equity. The conference is a networking opportunity for all government employees and officials. The event is hosted by the City of Seattle Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI). More information on RSJI and an event flyer can be found at www.seattle.gov/rsji or call 206-255-7556.

Plenary:Working with Government for Racial Equity
What are the challenges in working with government, and what are the opportunities for partnering?

Participants:
Kalpana Krishnamurthy, Gender Justice and RACE Program Director, Western States Center, and PRE Advisory Board Member
Dustin Washington, Community Justice Program Director AFSC and People's Institute Northwest Trainer
Lori Villarosa

Workshop:Structural Racism: Measuring Racial Equity
What is structural racism, and how do we measure progress toward structural equity?

Kalpana Krishnamurthy and Lori Villarosa will be facilitating and coordinating this presentation.

November 15th, 2011 Los Angeles, CA
Southern California Grantmakers 2011 Annual Conference and Members' Meeting[only open to SCG Members].

Marking Progress: Evaluating Movement Toward Racial Justice
What is both meaningful and realistic when evaluating work to change complex, cumulative and deeply entrenched conditions such as racial inequities and injustice? How do we assess progress toward true transformation when so many of our indicators are transactional? How do issues of power and privilege affect evaluation and how can we address them in establishing useful indicators of progress? In spite of the conceptual and practical challenges, we all want to know if our short-term gains are leading to longer term, sustainable and important changes. This interactive session will frame challenges, offer examples of current evaluative efforts, and share suggestions to help lift up the right questions for funders, evaluators, national advocates and community-based practitioners to consider.

We will raise issues that have been written about in PRE's Critical Issues Forum, Vol. 3 Marking Progress: Movement Toward Racial Justice and explore implications for local, statewide and national work.

Presenters
Julie Quiroz-Martinez, Senior Fellow, Movement Strategy Center and PRE Advisory Board Member
Mari Ryono, Director of Development and Evaluation, Mobilize the Immigrant Vote
Lori Villarosa will be facilitating and coordinating this presentation.



Sunday, October 30th, 2011 Chicago, IL
Independent Sector 2011 Annual Conference

Tough Conversations
Fear of conflict or desire to avoid misunderstanding can sometimes get in the way of progress. What issues do we shy away from at our peril? Learn to initiate tough conversations in order to unearth - and address - difficult subjects before they stop you in your tracks.

Facilitator: Mikaela Seligman, Independent Sector
Discussion leaders: J.D. Hokoyama, Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics; Debra B. Natenshon, The Center for What Works; Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity; Jill Williams, Andrus Family Fund, Surdna Foundation, Inc.; Kara Inae Carlisle, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Alice Kim, Illinois Humanities Council; and Martha L. McCoy, Everyday Democracy (& PRE Advisory Board Member).



Thursday, October 6th, 2011 Seattle, WA
2011 Race & Social Justice Initiative (RSJI) Summit [Closed Event]

The RSJI Summit is a dynamic half-day event held every year to bring together racial justice change agents across City of Seattle and King County departments. The Summit is an opportunity for City employees working on racial equity to gain skills, strengthen relationships across departments and to hear about overall RSJI work, goals and priorities. This year the topics will include Race and Media, Measuring Racial Disparities, Power and Politics, and Structural Racism. About 300 city and county employees and nonprofit leaders are expected to attend the event.

Keynote by john a. powell, Executive Director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at the Ohio State University (and PRE Advisory Board Member)

Structural Racism: Measuring Racial Equity
This workshop will cover:

Presenters: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity; Maggie Potapchuk, MP Associates ; and Scott Winn, RSJI.



Wednesday, July 27th, 2011 2-3:30 PM EDT: Webinar
Marking Progress: Evaluating Movement Toward Racial Justice

Click here for Video and Audio of the Webinar, or here for slides.

While practitioners, advocates and funders increasingly understand the importance of using a structural racism lens or systemic approach, we have had less conversation about how to determine whether such work is generating the impacts we desire. What is both meaningful and realistic when evaluating work to change complex, cumulative and deeply entrenched outcomes and conditions? How do we assess progress toward transformation when so many of our indicators are transactional? In spite of the conceptual and practical challenges, we all want to know if our short-term gains are leading to longer term, sustainable and important changes.

This webinar addresses challenges, offers examples of current evaluative efforts, and shares suggestions to help us ask the right questions from various roles of community activist, advocate, researcher, or funder. More importantly, the interactive session and invitation to continue sharing comments and questions via email aims to ensure that we hear what funders, activists and others are struggling with or learning in their own evaluations.

Presenters
Michelle Fine, Distinguished Professor,The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Rinku Sen, Executive Director, Applied Research Center and Colorlines Magazine
Maya Wiley, Executive Director,Center for Social Inclusion
Coordinated and moderated by PRE's Lori Villarosa

This webinar raises issues that each of the presenters have written about in PRE's Critical Issues Forum, Vol. 3 Marking Progress: Movement Toward Racial Justice, as well as expands on them to reflect how our thinking has continued to evolve and as we have continued to hear about challenges raised by others.

June 7th, 2011, Webinar
Moving from Diversity to Racial Justice: Assessing our Giving

PRE's Lori Villarosa was featured in a webinar for Women's Donors Network to share findings from Catalytic Change: Lessons from The Racial Justice Grantmaking Assessment, which PRE developed in partnership with the Applied Research Center (ARC) and piloted with two foundations. She discussed strategies to determine and refine the ability of giving/grantmaking to achieve systemic and racially just solutions.

May, 2011

Keith Lawrence, of the Aspen Institute Roundtable on Community Change and a PRE Advisory Board Member, edited Race, Crime and Punishment: Breaking the Connection in America. With essays by Michelle Alexander, Eric Cadora, Blake Emerson, Ian Haney Lopez, Marc Mauer, Alan Mobley, Alice O'Connor, Jonathon Simon and Phil Thomson, the book examines the linkage of race, crime, and punishment in the public mind, and offers strategies for reducing the severe racial disproportionalities in the criminal justice system.



May 25, 2011, Asheville, NC
W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s America Healing: Building The Field And Connectiong The Leaders Conference [Closed Event]

Measuring Our Progress: Racial Equity Evaluation Tools and Success Markers

If data are needed to make a case for injustice and to show progress, then how can we measure progress in achieving racial equity? Choosing the accurate and realistic indicators and markers of success are critical parts of data collection. So, how do community leaders, advocates, and decision makers know when real progress toward racial justice is being made? There is an increasing demand in communities and institutions across the country for evaluation tools that help to establish appropriate success indicators and assess progress towards achieving racial equity. What racial justice assessment issues have been most important to advocacy and community organizing groups on the ground? How does evaluation contribute to or detract from the ongoing activities of community organizers? This session will engage evaluators and other community leaders in robust discussions and exchanges about a variety of racial healing and racial equity assessment strategies and social justice success markers.

Moderator: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE). Panelists: Sally Leiderman, Center for Assessment and Policy Development; Donna-Marie Winn, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Lloyd Asato, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum.

April 10-12, 2011, Philadelphia, PA

Council on Foundations Annual Conference

April 12, 2011, Philadelphia, PA

10:00-11:30 AM: Onsite Seminar
Speaking of Race: Communications, the Unconscious Mind and Public Policy

As political and cultural discourse on race becomes increasingly polarized, it is critical to understand its role in public-policy debates. This session explored the data on ways hidden and explicit racial messages affect public enthusiasm for particular policies—and how funders can address race directly for greater impact.  

Presenters: Kica Matos,  U.S. Reconciliation and Human Rights Program of Atlantic Philanthropies; john powell, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at The Ohio State University; and Rinku Sen, Applied Research Center and Colorlines Magazine.  Coordinated and moderated by Lori Villarosa, PRE

February 25, 2011, New York, NY

EVALUATION AS A TOOL FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE: A Continuing Conversation and Call to Action Among Funders, Evaluators and Community-based Practitioners

Invitation Only Workshop at The Graduate Center, City University of NY, NYC

This event is co-sponsored by: The Public Science Project, The Graduate Center - CUNY: Michelle Fine, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Maria Elena Torre, Director;The Full Frame Initiative:  Katya Fels Smyth, Founder and Executive Director and Rasmia Kirmani Frye, Director of Community-Based Policy

Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Detroit, MI
W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Strong Sector Initiative Convening [Closed Event]

Racial Equity and Inclusiveness to Strengthen the Sector

This interactive session, developed by PRE, addressed both internal and external needs and opportunities for broadening or deepening racial equity, diversity and inclusiveness policies and practices within the nonprofit and philanthropic infrastructure organizations. It shared and built upon the efforts of participants, as well as brought in lessons and tools from others in the field.

Presenters/facilitators: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) and Maggie Potapchuk, MP Associates

Webinar, December 2nd, 1-2:30 PM EST
PRE co-hosted a webinar and discussion on Applied Research Center’s Better Together: Research Findings on the Relationship between Racial Justice Organizations and LGBT Communities report funded by Arcus Foundation.  It was open to all organizations but was especially relevant to community-based organizations, funders, and activist organizationst that are working on racial justice and/or LGBT issues.

Co-Hosted By:
Applied Research Center (ARC), Arcus Foundation, Funders for LGBTQ Issues, and PRE

The featured speakers included:
Rinku Sen, President, Applied Research Center
Roz Lee, Senior Program Officer, Arcus Foundation
Lori Villarosa, Executive Director, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity
Rickke Mananzala, Former Executive Director, FIERCE

October 27-29, 2010, New Orleans, LA
Grantmakers for Education Annual Conference

October 27, 2010, New Orleans, LA
1:30-4:30 PM: Onsite Seminar
The Uncomfortable Conversation: How Grantmaking Practices can Advance or Hinder Racial Equity

This seminar explored the professional practices and organizational strategies that are relevant in understanding both the persistence of racial inequality in education and the efforts that must be undertaken to address it. Together, we considered the implications of naming racial equity as a goal of our work and began to put together practices that promote equity at the center of how we work. Key questions that participants were prompted to explore included: Where does race figure into the institutional and structural dynamics of the problems we are trying to solve? How might these dynamics be replicated in our own work? How do the power dynamics of the grantmaking role, combined with the class and race dimensions of the institutional settings in which we work, shape our thinking and action in this arena? What thoughtful practices should we adopt regarding power and privilege?

Facilitator: Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE)

Presenter: Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, African American Policy Forum

September 23 - 24, 2010, Chicago, IL
The Applied Research Center's Facing Race Conference
Marking Progress: Evaluating Movement Toward Racial Justice

While practitioners, advocates and funders increasingly understand the importance of using a structural racism lens or systemic approach, we have had less conversation about how to determine whether such work is generating the impacts we desire. What is both meaningful and realistic when evaluating work to change complex, cumulative and deeply entrenched outcomes and conditions? How do we assess progress toward transformation when so many of our indicators are transactional? In spite of the conceptual and practical challenges, we all want to know if our short-term gains are leading to longer term, sustainable and important changes. This panel framed challenges, offered examples of current evaluative efforts, and shared suggestions to help us ask the right questions from various roles of community activist, advocate, researcher, or funder. More importantly, we conducted an interactive session to ensure that we heard what activists and others in the room are struggling with or learning in their own evaluations.

Presenters
Michelle Fine, Distinguished Professor, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Rinku Sen, Executive Director, The Applied Research Center
Lori Villarosa, Executive Director, The Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

Thursday and Friday, May 27 and 28, 2010, Oakland, CA
The California Endowment [Closed Event]
Racial Justice Training Institute

PRE assisted in coordinating a pilot training institute for key staff and community parters of The California Endowment (TCE)'s Building Healthy Communities program to provide a shared experience in deepening awareness and understanding of:

• Structural racism or racialization, and how it impacts our communities;
• The use of a racial equity lens in policy analysis, program development and evaluation; and
• Ways that the foundation, its grantee partners and communities can build effective coalitions with shared goals to more effectively combat the inequities and increase opportunity for all.

Presenters
john powell, Executive Director, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity
Rinku Sen, Executive Director, Applied Research Center
Jesse Mills, Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of San Diego
Catherine Tactaquin, Executive Director, National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights
Danielle Mahones, Executive Director, Center for Third World Organizing
Lori Villarosa, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

This event was open to TCE staff and invited community partners only.

Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 9:30am - 11:30am, Center for Healthy Communities, Los Angeles, CA
Southern California Grantmakers
The Economy and Racial Equity: Strategies to Increase Recovery for All

Foundations are keenly aware of the uneven impact that the economic crisis has had on Californians, with effects divided along lines of gender, race and geography. Gaps in unemployment, income and assets that existed before the downturn persist, and in many cases are being widened with the uneven economic recovery.

While it is important to have universal goals around economic recovery, research increasingly indicates policy responses that are focused on the needs of the hardest-hit communities may achieve better results for the broader community. Known as "targeted universalism", this policy strategy also makes more efficient use of public investments.

Presented by Southern California Grantmakers and the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity, this program explores how grantmakers can use targeted universalism to reach communities most impacted by the economic crisis.

Who May Attend: Current SCG members and other grantmakers eligible for SCG membership. Eligibility requirements.

Please RSVP to programsrsvp@socalgrantmakers.org by May 19, 2010.

Presenters
john powell, Executive Director, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity
Paulina Gonzalez, Executive Director, Strategic Actions for a Just Economy
Lori Villarosa, Executive Director, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity

Tuesday, February 22, 2010
PRE/ARC Webinar
Catalytic Change: Lessons from the Racial Justice Grantmaking Assessment

While many funders have expressed their commitment to addressing inequities in their communities, there is often still a disconnect between these aspirations and the grantmaking strategies needed to truly improve opportunity and outcomes for all. Join Applied Research Center (ARC) and the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) in a webinar as they share key findings from Catalytic Change: Lessons Learned from the Racial Justice Grantmaking Assessment. Speakers will share strategies to determine and refine the ability of your own grantmaking to achieve systemic and racially just solutions. The webinar will also feature the heads of the two foundations who piloted the assessment, offering practical insights from boards, staff, and grantee partners that you can build upon in your work.

Presenters:
Rinku Sen, Executive Director, Applied Research Center
Lori Villarosa, Executive Director, PRE
Patricia Brandes, Executive Director, Barr Foundation
Margaret O'Bryon, President and CEO, Consumer Health Foundation

In this Webinar you will learn to:

• Establish a racial justice lens in grantmaking;
• Move beyond the "diversity lens" and recognize the potential and limitations of intervening at the individual, institutional, or structural levels;
• Create a clear set of definitions, questions and processes to help assess internal and external systems that support people of color;
• Understand how being explicit vs. implicit about racial dynamics can affect outcomes; and
• Use analytic tools to examine the efficacy of organizational commitments to racial equity

VIEW SLIDES

 

May 2009
PRE, together with the Applied Research Center (ARC) introduce joint publication: Catalytic Change: Lessons Learned from the Racial Justice Grantmaking Assessment

This report was developed following ARC s 2004 publication of Short Changed: Foundation Giving in Communities of Color. That report documented, as recent reports have confirmed, decreasing grantmaking with clear racial justice impacts, as well as decreasing support for organizations led by people of color. As foundation executives grapple with the meaning of racial disparities in philanthropy and how to remedy them, we hope that the ARC -PRE assessment will help all of us understand how foundations can advance racial equity more effectively. The report highlights lessons learned from the pilot assessments at two foundations, the Consumer Health Foundation in Washington, DC and the Barr Foundation in Boston, MA

May, 2009

PRE Advisory Board Member, Makani Themba with The Praxis Project, published Fair Game:A Strategy Guide for Racial Justice Communications in the Obama Era; The Praxis Project, May 2009. A workbook-style guide designed to help racial justice advocates navigate new political waters. Through case studies, planning tools, and the latest research, Fair Game invites readers to explore proven strategies that offer promise for future success, and to consider what we must do over the long term to regain lost ground.